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SMETER

Letting the kit do the talking when it comes to thermal efficiency

Date posted:
24th February 2021
SMETER
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Project Overview

The Smart Meter Enabled Thermal Efficiency Ratings (SMETER) programme was established to develop, test and demonstrate technologies that measure the thermal performance of homes using smart meters and other data.

Working on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the programme will play a key role in improving the reliability and accuracy of Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs).

EPCs are currently based on the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP). Calculating a homes’ energy efficiency using SAP can be inaccurate ratings due to assumptions made during a visual survey.

By 2030, all social housing homes must have a minimum EPC rating of C (the current guideline is E). As part of the programme, Halton Housing provided 30 homes and enlisted the help of 30 customer volunteers to create an industry-leading data set that is among the largest in the world.

Why did we get involved?

As well as being fully funded and enhancing our reputation within the sector the project has given access to data that has not been available before. The data can inform us on how to make better decisions and introduces IoT capabilities to the business.

The final solution will better inform housing providers like Halton Housing when making choices on how its homes are improved and upgraded to meet the minimum energy efficiency rating of C by 2030, showing which ones are poor performers and need addressing first. We will also be able to evidence improvements in our carbon footprint.

Who’s involved

Working on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), the Smart Meter Enabled Thermal Efficiency Ratings (SMETER) programme was delivered by Halton Housing in conjunction with leading universities Loughborough University, Leeds Beckett University, and University College London.

Benefits & Outcomes

The programme will help to inform our choices on how we improve and upgrade our homes, showing us which ones are poor performers and need addressing first. It will allow us to evidence improvements in our carbon footprint, help advise customers on the average cost to heat their home and allow us to suggest lifestyle changes to help them save money and reduce their impact on the environment.

Thanks to the findings and data from the programme, BEIS is now looking at a solution that can be certified and used across the UK to help contribute towards the UK meeting its 2030 Fuel Poverty target.

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